After a workout, persistent muscle may indicate a muscle injury. Some advice for treating muscle pain is provided by the LIFE Centre and the Department of Physiotherapy at Singapore General Hospital (SGH).

The straining or tearing of muscle fibres causes a muscle ache. A muscle can get strained for one of two reasons: either it has been overextended or it has been forced to contract with too much effort.

Only a few muscular fibres are stretched or injured in minor situations, leaving the muscle intact and powerful.

However, under extreme conditions, the muscle could be torn and rendered useless. Clinicians commonly categorise muscle strains into three groups based on the degree of muscle fibre damage to make diagnosis and treatment easier.

What Is Muscle Pain?

Muscular pain is a fairly common condition that causes discomfort or soreness in one or more of our body’s muscles.

It could be caused by a variety of factors, such as overusing the muscles, accidents, tension, stress, and occasionally even medical conditions.

This type of pain can range from mild to severe, and it can be acute (short-term pain) or chronic (long-term).

Acute muscular pain often develops unexpectedly, is frequently brought on by a specific accident, and sporadic muscle overuse injuries.

Chronic muscle pain, on the other hand, is more persistent and can be caused by a variety of conditions, including fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Anyone can feel this soreness, regardless of their age or level of exercise, and it can significantly reduce their capacity to perform daily acitivity.

What are the Causes of Muscle Pain?

Localised and systemic muscle aches fall into two main categories.i Systemic muscle pain refers to when your entire body and system of muscles ache, whereas localised muscle pain refers to an individual muscle or small area of the body that aches.

Localised muscular discomfort often results from a particular activity, such as overuse from exercise or strain from spending all day slumped over a laptop.

It’s most likely a disease, an infection, or a pharmaceutical adverse effect if you have systemic muscle discomfort.Fibromyalgia, lupus, muscular cramps, strains, and repetitive strain injuries are a few of the more prevalent causes of both types of muscle aches and pains, as can drugs—specifically, cholesterol medications known as “statins”—Lyme disease.

What are the Types of Muscle Pain?

Muscle pain can come in three different forms:

Acute Muscle discomfort: 

A strain or sprain, for example, can result in this kind of muscle discomfort. It generally appears out of nowhere and can be very bad.

Acute muscular pain typically goes away with rest, though it could sometimes call for medicine or physical therapy.

Chronic Muscle discomfort: 

lasts for a longer time, typically longer than three months.

It may result from overuse or repetitive strain injuries, as well as underlying medical conditions like fibromyalgia or myofascial pain syndrome.

Treatment for chronic muscle pain can be difficult and may involve a combination of medication, physical therapy, and dietary adjustments.

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS): 

DOMS is the soreness and stiffness experienced in the muscles following vigorous exercise.

It typically happens between 24 and 48 hours after working out and might linger for several days. Muscle tissue injury causes DOMS, a normal reaction that typically goes away on its own without medical intervention.

To choose the most appropriate course of treatment, it is critical to comprehend the type of muscle discomfort you are dealing with.

Rest, ice, and over-the-counter painkillers can usually be used to treat acute muscular soreness and DOMS.

However, treating chronic muscle pain calls for a more all-encompassing strategy that also addresses any underlying medical issues and lifestyle adjustments.

What are the Treatment of Muscle Pain?

The method used to treat muscle pain depends on the type, degree, and underlying cause of the pain. Here are a few typical remedies for muscular pain:

By Resting: 

Resting the injured muscle is necessary to promote healing and recovery. This is crucial for acute muscle pain brought on by trauma or injury.

Ice or Heat Therapy: 

Ice or heat applied to the affected area can aid with pain relief and inflammation reduction. Heat is more helpful for treating persistent muscular pain than ice, which is often used for acute injuries.

Painkillers: 

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, and over-the-counter painkillers like acetaminophen can help relieve pain and reduce inflammation.

Muscular pain is a fairly common condition that causes discomfort or soreness in one or more of our body’s muscles.

It could be caused by a variety of factors, such as overusing the muscles, accidents, tension, stress, and occasionally even medical conditions.

This type of pain can range from mild to severe, and it can be acute (short-term pain) or chronic (long-term).

Acute muscular pain often develops unexpectedly, is frequently brought on by a specific accident, and sporadic muscle overuse injuries.

Chronic muscle pain, on the other hand, is more persistent and can be caused by a variety of conditions, including fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Anyone, regardless of age or level of exercise, can feel this soreness.

 

Read more about other pain – Abdominal Pain , Somatic Pain